Colorado Parents “Beg” for a Bill Allowing Medical Pot to Autistic Children

Parents, who have children suffer from autism, want to see a bill legalizing medical marijuana for children passed in Colorado. (File image via Shutterstock)

Jamie Kropp from Colorado, whose son, Kolt, has autism, urged lawmakers on Friday: “I’m begging you to approve this bill.”

Kropp is among other parents who want to see a bill allowing medical cannabis to autistic children get a final passage.

Luckily, after an acrimonious debate with psychiatrists and the head of the state Health Department, House Bill 18-1263 was approved by a 12-1 vote. It passed its first hurdle at the Capitol, the Denver Post reported.

The bill would permit doctors to recommend marijuana as a treatment for symptoms suffered by anyone diagnosed on the autism spectrum.

Psychiatrists and the head of the state Health Department opposed the bill, saying there isn’t any enough evidence.

“There is no easy answer,” said Dr. Meghan Schott, a psychiatrist with Denver Health. “… But, unfortunately, marijuana is not the answer at this point because we don’t have any research that supports that marijuana will be effective in the long-term.”

Colorado and Washington were the first U.S. states that have fully legalized marijuana in 2012.

More than 93,000 people in Colorado have active medical marijuana cards, the Denver Post reported, adding 314 of those age 17 or younger.

Colorado was a medical marijuana destination several years ago for parents with children who suffer from epilepsy, but as more states legalized medical cannabis their number had decreased.

So far, there are 29 U.S. states that have legalized medical marijuana, and the trend is continuing. 

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