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Medical Marijuana Bill Allows Utah to Grow Weed for Terminally ill Patients

Medical Marijuana Bill Allows Utah to Grow Weed for Terminally ill Patients

Latoya Jackman
Utah 20x15 - Medical Marijuana Bill Allows Utah to Grow Weed for Terminally ill Patients

In a recent push towards acceptance, a medical marijuana bill has been passed in Utah to grow cannabis for the terminally ill.

House Bill 197, previously proposed by Representative Brad Daw, died because of a lack of votes. However, the bill was revived on Tuesday. The bill demands the state to produce medical marijuana for terminally ill patients and also give those patients the rights to try medical marijuana. It supports the 195 House Bill.

Daw told his house colleagues that this bill becomes the way to supply a genuine cannabis medicine for both those programs.

“We need to pass this bill if we want to Give patients the ability to try both under right to try and under research.”

Many lawmakers agreed with Daw, where others remain troubled. The bill demands that marijuana is produced by the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food and dispensed to patients accordingly. The bill was passed on a 38-32 vote, giving it enough status to proceed to the Senate.

Utah Medical Marijuana Supporters in favour of House Bills 195 197 - Medical Marijuana Bill Allows Utah to Grow Weed for Terminally ill Patients
Utah Medical Marijuana Supporters in favor of House Bills 195 & 197

House bills will be pushed ahead of the prospective ballot initiative.

The proposed house bills are scheduled to be pushed ahead of the prospective ballot initiative which is designed to significantly increase the number of persons that can use medical marijuana. This initiative is created to provide a variety of different treatment methods. Medicinal cannabis poll activity supporters said the bills would not stop their work.

House Majority Leader, Brad Wilson stated that there is evidence of unintended consequences that occur if you open up these floodgates all at once, or too quickly. Whereas, Minority Leader, Brian King changed his vote to “no”, in accordance with supporting the ballot initiative instead. In comparison, other lawmakers are afraid that the ballot initiative will have a negative impact on Utah public policy.

Wayne Niederhauser, Senate President pointed out some of the flaws in the initiative,

“it really goes a lot farther than what we would ever do as a legislature”

Tom Paskett with Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education, stated that he believes the bills are being actioned in order for the Utah State Legislature to portray that accomplishments have been made in regards to the matter. However, supporters are firm,

“The ballot initiative offers far more comprehensive coverage for medical cannabis patients. that’s what we’re aiming for.”

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