A Network of 800,000 Medical Professionals Partners With Cannabis Media Company

The Fresh Toast, a marijuana media company, partners up with Skipta, an organization made up of 600,000 physicians to educate Americans about cannabis
A sign advertises a medical marijuana dispensary on Venice Beach in Los Angeles, California, July 19, 2010. (Image via Reuters)

Skipta, a network of 800,000 medical professionals has partnered up with The Fresh Toast, a lifestyle company specializing in cannabis, to educate the American public.

To educate Americans about “cannabinoid medicine,” two U.S. companies have announced their partnership on Wednesday. Skipta, a leading social network community of 600,000 medical professionals and The Fresh Toast, a lifestyle media company specializing in cannabis, will work together on marijuana education. 

The partnership was sprung to fill a much-needed void. No hospital, no medical group, nor any practice has been integrated with a cannabis company,” the two organizations said in a statement.

“Through our partnership with Skipta, The Fresh Toast is establishing the first major channel for serious medical marijuana information with a network that includes 800,000 medical professionals including 600,000 physicians,” it said.

Christian Hendricks, a board member of The Fresh Toast and well-known media executive, said:

“There’s certainly demand for high-quality and trustworthy cannabis information.  People want to get it from a publisher they trust.”

John Hudak, Ph.D., a senior member in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and author of Marijuana: A Short History, said this new relationship between The French Toast and Skipta will:

“help fill a government-driven, gaping void in our understanding of medical cannabis and the realities of its practice in American society.”

medical professionals
Medical marijuana is displayed in Los Angeles, California, U.S. August 6, 2007. (Image via Reuters)

Cannabis is Not a “Silver Bullet”

JJ McKay, the founder and publisher of The Fresh Toast, said this will boost “public confidence and security in knowing that a medical professional, who has nothing to gain personally, will be able to share an honest opinion of treatment options.” He also explained that,

“this partnership does not view cannabis as a silver bullet that can cure chronic diseases, but rather as another important treatment option for patients.”

So far, there are many calls to further study marijuana especially in the U.S. where marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 drug by the Drug Enforcement Administration. However, according to the New England Journal of Medicine, 76 percent of doctors are in favor of the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes.

There are currently 29 states, including Florida, North Dakota, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Arkansas, Arizona and the District of Columbia, which allow medical cannabis.  

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