Ohioans hone marijuana skills as their state readies for medical legalization

The school offers three concentrations or an executive program that sums up all three. (File image via WKSU public radio)
The school offers three concentrations or an executive program that sums up all three. (File image via WKSU public radio)

In September, Ohio will be joining 29 U.S. states and D.C. in legalizing medical marijuana.

So far, Ohio decided to allow 60 dispensaries to be located throughout the state, which has more than 11 million in population.

This could be the reason why the Cleveland School of Cannabis has about 125 students enrolled a year in.

While the students aren’t necessarily dealing with the green marijuana plant right way since the school can’t grow or process marijuana on site, the school is working hard to graduate students, who have the required skills.

“We’re a career school, and we’re in the business of getting people jobs,” Austin Briggs told WKSU News.

Briggs, a Cleveland Heights native, had spent several years ago working in California’s marijuana industry. He hopes the school will fill the gaps in the skills needed for Ohio to succeed following legalization.

Group endorses pro-marijuana governor

In a related story, an advocacy group for legalized marijuana in Ohio has endorsed Democrat Bill O’Neill for governor, the Associated Press reported. 

Bill O'Neill, who is currently a longshot candidate for the Democratic nomination for governor, felt this would be a good time to go big. (Image via AP)
Bill O’Neill, who is currently a longshot candidate for the Democratic nomination for governor, felt this would be a good time to go big. (Image via AP)

The Ohio Cannabis Institute said it will promote the former Ohio Supreme Court justice among its significant following of registered voters before Tuesday’s primaries.

A spokesman for Sir Alan Mooney, the institute’s co-founder, said O’Neill is “the only one with a sound plan.”

The 70-year-old O’Neill, also a nurse, proposes legalizing and taxing recreational marijuana and using the proceeds to reopen shuttered state mental health facilities. His pro-legalization stance was a key motivation for O’Neill to enter the race. 

O’Neill faces former consumer watchdog Richard Cordray, former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich (koo-SIH’-nich) and state Sen. Joe Schiavoni (shuh-VOHN’-ee) for the Democratic nomination.

(With AP)

Comments