What’s in Your Weed? U.S. Startup to Produce Full Map of the Cannabis Genome

A total of 185 applications were submitted.
A total of 185 applications were submitted. (File image via Reuters)

A U.S. startup is trying to put an end to all speculations on what cannabis can or can’t do. Colorado-based Sunrise Genetics will tread a new path by producing the first-ever full map of the cannabis genome.

“DNA, of course, I’m biased because it’s what I do, but it doesn’t lie. It really is a way to just sort of clear a lot of the b.s.,” CJ Schwartz, the chief executive officer of Sunrise Genetics, in Fort Collins, told Bloomberg in an interview published on Wednesday.

He added:

“The excessive claims are really doing a disservice to the plant or the potential of the plant and the science surrounding that.”

Some are probably pitching far-fetched claims, saying that marijuana can cure cancer. While others, who use some scientific data to arbitrarily give their own interpretation, say that our bodies are built with cannabinoid receptors specifically designed to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), one of the primary active components of marijuana.

A further understanding of the marijuana DNA makeup, will not only verify all these assertions but it can further enhance and improve one’s marijuana experience.  

The research can help modify recreational products by examining how it could affect the body and the mind, Schwartz said.

It has already been known that certain marijuana strains can make one sleepy and others are the opposite, make people rather active. 

pro - What's in Your Weed? U.S. Startup to Produce Full Map of the Cannabis Genome
A sign celebrates the day at the Botana Care marijuana store just before opening the doors to customers for the first time in Northglenn, Colorado January 1, 2014. (Image via Reuters)

It is not a surprise that a Colorado company is going after marijuana’s DNA story. Colorado was one of the first U.S. states to legalize marijuana in 2014.

After legalization, and in the same year, Schwartz, a plant scientist, started Sunrise where he recruited his brother and his brother’s brother-in-law and a family friend.

The company’s idea was to take well-established genetic tools used for other crops and apply them to marijuana.

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