Women in Santa Monica host “high tea” parties with infused cannabis

cannabis tea A California based cannabis tea brand, Kikoko, is encouraging it’s mainly female users to host high tea parties with their products. (File image)
A California based cannabis tea brand, Kikoko, is encouraging it’s mainly female users to host high tea parties with their products. (File image)

A California-based cannabis tea brand, Kikoko, is encouraging it’s predominantly female users to host high tea parties with their products.

The company, founded by journalist Amanda Jones and tech entrepreneur Jennifer Chapin, wants women to sample cannabis tea in a setting that is non-intimidating for the novice user.

“We were hearing over and over what we call the ‘whole brownie syndrome’ where [new users] ate the whole brownie and rode the crazy train for hours and hours,” Jones told LA Magazine. “It was the days of the big brownie with 500 milligrams [of THC, the component of cannabis that gives people the “high”] wrapped in some nasty thing with a handwritten label.”

So she and Chapin envisioned something with beautiful packaging, which didn’t smell or taste like weed, aimed towards women with a sense of fellowship, and with very low doses of THC. Hence, Kikoko was conceived.

“We were told we’d get laughed out of dispensaries with those low doses [of THC]. We really had a strong gut feeling that women all over the place that weren’t stoners, that didn’t wanna get very high all the time, they wanted an alternative to that.”

Jones and Chapin assure their users they won’t get stoned from drinking the teas. In fact, they allege some may not even feel psychoactive effects at all especially with their lowest dose containing a 3:20 ratio of THC to CBD. The latter is the relaxing, non-psychoactive component of cannabis.

The point is to achieve a sense of well-being, which ultimately is why people drink tea in the first place.

When asked about their success in the cannabis business, both Chapin and Jones attribute it to “the women’s way”. They are strong proponents of female empowerment, especially as stats come out saying the number of female executives has dropped significantly in recent years.

“When we first started the business, people said, ‘You have to do it this way’ and we said, ‘Why? Let’s just do it the way we think is right,’” Jones says. “There’s always a better way. Always.”

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